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Does anyone care?

At Scaral we want to do work that matters, because we want to care about what we do. That's why we invest time and energy in a project to support the UK leather industry, it's why our founder spent so many years working in the public sector before creating Scaral.

The idea of ‘work that matters’ does not belong to us. It belongs to Seth Godin. Seth blogs about marketing matters and life choices. Mostly, we like Seth. 

Seth has written 10 questions that we should all ask ourselves about what we do and the impact it has on us and those around us. We have borrowed the best ones, edited them and taken the next logical step in their progression, so ask yourself the following questions and recognise where the value lies in your contribution.



Is your work difficult? It may not sound appealing, but work should be challenging; Struggle creates the opportunity to show what we can achieve. If absolutely anyone can do what you do, then your employer has all the power.


What are you doing that people believe only you can do? Acknowledge that you have the ability to contribute something unique and it should be valued. Primarily by you.


What do people say when they talk about you? Is it the same as what you WANT them to say about you? Your reputation or image is a concept that you can control. It may not match how you feel about yourself but perhaps it's time to realise that if people think you add value, then it's because you do.


What are you trying to change? It might be you, or it might be the world, but there’s always room for growth.


Would anyone miss your work if you stopped? Would you?


What contribution are you making? The idea of contribution goes back to an earlier post in which we wrote about the difference between a ‘job’ and a ‘role’. Your contribution is the thing that only you bring to the ‘job’. The thing that makes it your ‘role’ in an organisation. This is where you find your value.



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